Showing 1–24 of 54 results

Abaqus shaft slip ring simulation | Using Python scripts for parametric analysis

 270.0
The shaft slip ring is a crucial component enabling the transfer of power and signals in rotating systems. So, this tutorial delves into the intricate Abaqus shaft slip ring analysis. It focuses primarily on the mechanical aspects, offering insights into displacement, stress fields, and strains through the shaft analysis Abaqus model. The tutorial utilizes parametric modeling and Python scripting for the Abaqus shaft slip ring simulation. So, it enables you to optimize geometric parameters, material properties, and loading conditions, enhancing efficiency in modeling processes. It addresses complexities such as creep behavior and material interactions, providing a comprehensive approach tailored for realistic simulations. The tutorial meets various project requirements, supporting them with practical examples and adaptable simulation files.

Dynamic Response of Ballasted Rail Track Under a Moving Load

 190.0

Railway tracks are subjected to moving loads of trains and this causes vibration and degradation of the track. The judgment of these vibrations is important to design the railway tracks. The design involves the permissible speed of trains and the maximum axle load of the train. The model given here creates a 3D geometry of a railway track and applies a moving load in the form of a wheel. A user can change the speeds and the properties of the material including geometry as per their needs.

Hydroforming process simulation using VDLOAD subroutine in Abaqus

 170.0
(1)
Dive into the intricacies of hydroforming simulation in Abaqus alongside the VDLOAD subroutine with our comprehensive guide. This tutorial delves into the essence of the Abaqus hydroforming simulation, unraveling the nuances of the hydroforming process simulation. Hydroforming, a specialized metal shaping technique applicable to diverse materials like steel, copper, and aluminum, is explored in depth. In the workshop component, we specifically focus on advanced hydroforming simulation using the VDLOAD subroutine, highlighting its pivotal role in specifying fluid pressure on sheet metal forming. Learn how to apply the Functional Fluid Pressure Loading feature for precise control over fluid pressure dynamics. Additionally, explore the Smooth Amplitude option for defining part displacement seamlessly, without introducing dynamic changes during problem-solving. Conclude your exploration with a comparative analysis of simulation outcomes, dissecting scenarios with and without fluid pressure using Abaqus hydroforming simulation. Engage in discussions on subroutine writing, delving into the intricacies of incorporating Fluid Pressure Loading into your simulations. This guide offers a natural progression through hydroforming and VDLOAD, providing valuable insights for efficient and accurate simulations.

FSI analysis in Abaqus

 59.0
(1)
Notice: This package will be available one week after purchase. Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) refers to the interaction between a deformable or movable structure and an internal or surrounding fluid flow. FSI simulations are vital for understanding and predicting the behavior of systems where fluid and solid components interact. These simulations enable engineers and researchers to study the effects of fluid forces on structures and vice versa. FSI simulations are crucial in various fields, including aerospace, civil engineering, biomechanics, and automotive industries. They provide valuable insights into the performance, safety, and reliability of engineering systems. By accurately modeling the complex interactions between fluids and structures, FSI simulations can identify potential issues such as vibrations, instabilities, and structural failures. In this package, you’ll learn simulating FSI in Abaqus within 3 workshops.

Johnson-Holmquist damage model in Abaqus

 159.0
(1)
The Johnson-Holmquist damage model is used in solid mechanics to simulate the mechanical behavior of damaged brittle materials over a range of strain rates, including ceramics, rocks, and concrete. These materials typically exhibit gradual degradation under load due to the development of microfractures and typically have high compressive strength but low tensile strength. In this package, there are 13 practical examples to teach you how to use this damage model. The workshops are categorized into Ceramic materials, concrete, glass materials, and others.

Abaqus Damage Model for Thermoplastic Polymers with UMAT Subroutine

 320.0
(1)
Thermoplastic polymers are materials composed of long molecular chains primarily consisting of carbon. These polymers possess the unique ability to be shaped and molded under heat and pressure while retaining their stability once formed. This high formability makes them widely used in various industries, including furniture production, plumbing fixtures, automotive components, food packaging containers, and other consumer products. This package introduces a thermodynamically consistent damage model capable of accurately predicting failure in thermoplastic polymers.  The implementation of this model is explained through the use of an ABAQUS user material (UMAT) subroutine. The package is structured as follows. The introduction section Provides an overview of thermoplastic polymers and their mechanical properties. In the Theory section, the constitutive damage model and its formulation are reviewed. Then, an algorithm for numerically integrating the damage constitutive equations is presented in the Implementation section. In the UMAT Subroutine section, a detailed explanation of the flowchart and structure of the subroutine is provided. Finally, two simulation examples, namely the T-fitting burst pressure test and the D-Split test, are performed and the obtained results, are investigated. Notice: Software files and A full PDF guideline (Problem description, theory, ...) are available; Videos are coming soon.

Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) structures simulation in Abaqus

 129.0
(1)
Ultra-High Performance Concrete structures refer to structures that are constructed using Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC). UHPC is a specialized type of concrete known for its exceptional strength, durability, and resistance to various environmental and loading conditions. UHPC structures can include bridges, high-rise buildings, infrastructure components, architectural elements, and more. Simulating UHPC structures is of significant importance. Through simulation, engineers can analyze and predict the structural behavior and performance of UHPC under different loading conditions. This includes assessing factors such as stress distribution, deformation, and failure mechanisms. By simulating UHPC structures, engineers can optimize the design, evaluate the structural integrity, and ensure the safety and reliability of these complex systems. In this project package, you will learn simulating the UHPC structures with many practical examples.

Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) beams simulation in Abaqus

 109.0
(1)
Notice: This package will be available one week after purchase. UHPC (Ultra-High Performance Concrete) is an advanced type of concrete known for its exceptional strength, durability, and resistance. It consists of a dense matrix of fine particles, high-strength aggregates, and a low water-to-cement ratio. UHPC offers superior performance and is used in construction projects where high-strength and durability are required. UHPC (Ultra-High Performance Concrete) beams are advanced structural elements known for their exceptional strength, durability, and resistance. Simulating UHPC beams using software like Abaqus is crucial for evaluating their behavior under different loads and optimizing their design. With Abaqus simulations, engineers can analyze the structural response, stresses, and deformations of UHPC beams, ensuring they meet safety standards and design requirements. In this project package, you will learn how to simulate UHPC beams in 6 practical workshops.

Techniques of simulating Large and Complex models in Abaqus

 158.0
(1)
Sometimes, there is a need to simulate large or complex models in Abaqus, such as airplanes and cars. Generally, models with more than 5 million variables or take at least 12 hours to analyze are considered large. Processing such models requires a significant amount of time and energy, in addition to potential issues with modeling, loading, boundary conditions, and more. Therefore, it is necessary to find ways to simplify and accelerate the analysis of such models. In this training package, you will learn various methods to address these challenges. Dealing with large models typically involves simplifying the model, making efficient use of system resources, and minimizing CPU time. These techniques are explained in detail here. Additionally, you will be taught various techniques to aid in the management of large models, including submodeling, history output filtering, restart functionality, and parts and assemblies.

Piezoelectric simulation in Abaqus

 185.0
(1)
Piezoelectric materials exhibit a unique property known as piezoelectricity, where they can generate electric charges when subjected to mechanical stress or deformation, and conversely, deform when an electric field is applied. This phenomenon arises from their crystal structure, enabling the conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy and vice versa. Simulating piezoelectric materials is of great importance as it allows engineers to optimize the design and performance of devices and systems that utilize these materials. Through simulations, engineers can analyze factors like stress distribution, deformation, and electrical response, aiding in performance prediction and failure analysis. Simulations also enable the study of parameter sensitivity, understanding how changes in parameters impact piezoelectric devices. This information helps in making informed design decisions and optimizing the integration of piezoelectric components into larger systems. Furthermore, simulating piezoelectric materials reduces the need for physical prototypes, saving time and costs associated with experimental setups. It enhances the understanding and development of piezoelectric technology, facilitating its widespread application in various industries. In this training package, you will learn what is a piezoelectric, types of piezoelectric, piezoelectric applications, and how to simulate piezoelectrics in Abaqus.

Abaqus for Civil Engineering Part-1

Original price was: € 1424.0.Current price is: € 1139.0.
(1)
The "Abaqus for Civil Engineering” package is a comprehensive and invaluable resource designed to cater to the needs of civil engineering professionals, students, and enthusiasts alike. This all-inclusive package comprises a collection of several specialized tutorial packages, making it an essential tool for mastering various aspects of civil engineering. With this package, you gain access to an extensive library of high-quality video tutorials that cover a wide range of topics within civil engineering. Each tutorial provides clear, concise, and engaging explanations of fundamental concepts, advanced techniques, and practical applications.

Hydroforming simulation in Abaqus

 39.0
(1)
Notice: This package will be available one week after purchase. Hydroforming is a metal forming process that allows the shaping of various metals, such as steel, stainless steel, copper, aluminum, and brass. It is a cost-effective and specialized form of die molding that utilizes highly pressurized fluid to shape the metal. Hydroforming can be classified into two main categories: sheet hydroforming and tube hydroforming. Sheet hydroforming uses a single die and a sheet of metal, while tube hydroforming involves expanding metal tubes using two die halves. Hydroforming simulation in Abaqus is a valuable tool for optimizing the hydroforming process. It enables engineers to predict and analyze important factors such as material flow, stress distribution, thinning, and wrinkling during the forming process. By accurately simulating the hydroforming process, engineers can optimize key parameters like fluid pressure, die design, and material properties to achieve the desired shape with minimal defects. In this package, you will learn hydroforming process simulation with the SPH method and using time-pressure curve.

Arc welding simulation in Abaqus

 39.0
(1)
Notice: This package will be available one week after purchase. Arc welding is a fusion process that involves joining metals by applying intense heat, causing them to melt and mix. The resulting metallurgical bond provides strength and integrity to the welded joint. Arc welding is widely used in various industries for fabricating structures and components. Arc welding simulation in Abaqus is essential for optimizing the welding process and ensuring high-quality welds. It allows engineers to predict and analyze factors such as temperature distribution, residual stresses, distortion, and microstructure evolution during welding. By accurately simulating the welding process, parameters like welding speed, heat input, and electrode positioning can be optimized to achieve desired weld characteristics and minimize defects.

Tunnel excavation simulation using TBM in Abaqus

 49.0
(2)
Notice: This package will be available one week after purchase. Tunnel Boring Machines (TBMs) are advanced construction equipment used to excavate tunnels with efficiency and precision. These massive machines consist of a rotating cutting wheel equipped with disc cutters, which excavate the soil or rock, and a conveyor system that removes the excavated material from the tunnel. TBMs play a crucial role in various industries, including transportation, mining, and underground infrastructure development. TBM simulation is of utmost importance in the planning and execution of tunneling projects. It allows engineers and project managers to evaluate the feasibility of different tunneling methods, optimize the design and operation of TBMs, and predict potential challenges and risks. By simulating the TBM's performance and behavior under various geological conditions, factors such as ground stability, excavation rates, cutter wear, and potential impacts on surrounding structures can be analyzed and mitigated. In this package, you will learn how to do a TBM simulations by several practical examples.

Blood Flow Analysis in Abaqus

 49.0
(1)
  Human blood is a vital fluid that circulates through the body, carrying oxygen, nutrients, hormones, and immune cells. Simulation of human blood is crucial for understanding cardiovascular diseases, hemodynamics, and therapeutic interventions. It enables researchers to study the complex behavior of blood flow, investigate disease mechanisms, and develop improved diagnostic and treatment strategies. This package contains three workshops that would help you simulate blood flow in vessels: “Human blood with coronary vessel Fluid Structure Interaction simulation in Abaqus”, “Blood and vessel FSI simulation using Abaqus-Co Simulation process”, and “Non-Newtonian blood flow Simulation in Abaqus”.

Friction Stir Welding (FSW) Simulation in Abaqus

 138.0
(1)
Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process that utilizes a rotating tool to generate frictional heat, enabling the consolidation of materials without melting. FSW offers numerous benefits and is particularly valuable for welding challenging materials like aluminum alloys. It finds widespread applications in industries such as automotive, aerospace, shipbuilding, and construction, providing enhanced strength, weight reduction, and structural integrity. FSW minimizes distortion, reduces the need for post-weld machining, and eliminates issues related to solidification and cooling. Simulations using Abaqus, a popular finite element analysis software, play a crucial role in optimizing FSW processes. Engineers can investigate process parameters, evaluate weld quality, predict residual stresses and distortions, and optimize weld designs through Abaqus simulations. These simulations enable cost-effective development, improved weld quality, reduced material waste, and enhanced productivity in industrial applications. In this package, you will learn how to simulate FSW simulations in a variety of examples with different methods.

Soil Impact Analysis in Abaqus

 68.0
(1)
Soil impact refers to the interaction between a solid object and the soil, wherein the object collides with or penetrates into the soil. This issue holds great importance across various industries, including civil engineering, geotechnical engineering, construction, and transportation. Understanding soil impact behavior is crucial for designing and assessing the safety and performance of structures and systems subjected to dynamic loads, such as vehicle collisions, pile driving, and projectile impacts. Simulation plays a vital role in studying soil impact. By employing advanced numerical methods and software tools like Abaqus, researchers and engineers can accurately model and analyze the complex interactions between objects and soil. Simulation allows for the investigation of various parameters, such as impact velocity, soil properties, object geometry, and boundary conditions, to assess their influence on the response and behavior of the system. In this package, you will learn how to do soil impact simulations in several practical examples.

Low-Velocity Impact simulation in Abaqus

 98.0
(2)
Low-velocity impact refers to the collision between objects at relatively low speeds. While the impact energy may be lower compared to high-speed impacts, low-velocity impacts can still cause significant damage and deformation. Assessing the effects of low-velocity impact is crucial for various industries to ensure the structural integrity, safety, and performance of their products. For example, in the automotive industry, understanding the response of vehicles to low-velocity impacts is essential for designing crashworthy structures and improving occupant safety. In aerospace, assessing the impact resistance of aircraft components, such as fuselage panels or wings, helps ensure their ability to withstand ground handling incidents or bird strikes. In this package, you will learn how to do low-velocity impact simulations with several practical examples.

Ultra-High-Performance Fiber Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC) structures in Abaqus

 129.0
(1)
UHPFRC (Ultra-High-Performance Fiber Reinforced Concrete) structures have emerged as a groundbreaking innovation in construction. These structures offer exceptional strength, durability, and performance, revolutionizing the industry. UHPFRC incorporates a precise combination of Portland cement, fine aggregates, admixtures, and steel or synthetic fibers, resulting in an extraordinarily dense and robust composite material. With compressive strengths exceeding 150 MPa, UHPFRC structures exhibit enhanced resistance to cracking, increased load-bearing capacity, and improved durability against environmental factors such as corrosion and freeze-thaw cycles. The superior mechanical properties of UHPFRC enable the design of slimmer and lighter elements, leading to reduced material consumption and more sustainable construction practices. UHPFRC structures find applications in various fields, including bridges, high-rise buildings, marine structures, and precast elements, offering long-term performance and contributing to the advancement of modern construction. In this package, you will learn how to simulate these structures with many practical examples.

High-Velocity Impact Simulation in Abaqus

 139.0
(1)
High-velocity impact refers to the collision between two bodies at extremely high speeds, typically involving projectiles and targets. It is a phenomenon of great interest in various fields, including defense, aerospace, and automotive industries. High-velocity impact simulation in Abaqus is a computational approach used to analyze and predict the behavior of materials and structures subjected to such impacts. Abaqus, a powerful finite element analysis software, enables engineers and researchers to model and simulate the complex interactions between impacting bodies, accurately predicting factors like stress, strain, deformation, and damage. By simulating high-velocity impacts in Abaqus, engineers can gain valuable insights into the performance and integrity of materials and structures, ultimately aiding in the design of safer and more resilient systems. In this package, you will learn how to do these simulations in many practical examples.

Full Composite fatigue Add-on (Academic and industrial usage)

Original price was: € 1800.0.Current price is: € 1440.0.
This package is designed to instruct users on how to utilize the composite fatigue modeling Add-on, which removes the need to write a subroutine for composite fatigue modeling. Instead, users can select the composite type, input material properties, and generate the subroutine by clicking a button. The Add-on includes four types of composites, and the generated subroutine for all types is the UMAT. These four types are Unidirectional, Woven, short fiber composites (chopped), and wood. The fatigue criteria used for each type are the same as its respective package. For example, the fatigue criteria for woven composites are identical to that used in the "Simulation of woven composite fatigue in Abaqus" package. This Add-on provides a simple graphical user interface for composite fatigue modeling, which can be utilized for both academic and industrial applications.

Full Composite damage Add-on (Academic and industrial usage)

Original price was: € 1800.0.Current price is: € 1440.0.
(15)
This package will teach you how to use the composite damage modeling Add-on. The Add-on eliminates the need for writing a subroutine for composite damage modeling. Instead, you only need to select the desired composite type, input the material properties, and click a button. The Add-on will then generate the subroutine for you. The Add-on includes four types of composites: Unidirectional, Woven, short fiber composites (chopped), and wood. The generated subroutine for all types is the VUSDFLD. The damage criteria used in each type is the same as the one used in its respective package. For instance, the damage criteria for the woven composite is identical to the one used in the "Simulation of woven composite damage in the Abaqus" package. This Add-on offers a user-friendly graphical user interface for composite damage modeling, which can be used for academic and industrial purposes.

Abaqus Explosion

 89.0
(1)
An explosion is a rapid and violent release of energy, usually accompanied by a loud noise, heat, and pressure waves. Explosions can be caused by a variety of factors such as chemical reactions, combustion, nuclear reactions, or mechanical failure. Explosions can cause severe damage to buildings, infrastructure, and human life. To minimize the impact of such incidents, accurate and reliable simulation of explosions is crucial. Explosion simulation involves modeling the complex interactions of blast waves, shock waves, and debris with the surrounding environment. By simulating explosions, engineers and scientists can identify potential risks and develop effective safety measures. In this package, you will learn how to model explosions in different situations with practical examples, such as Air blast explosion simulation inside an RC room and Subsurface explosion simulation on buried steel pipelines.

9 Practical Workshops for SPH in Abaqus💡 | Abaqus SPH Tutorial

 109.0
(4)
Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Tutorial: Abaqus SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a numerical method used in this software to model fluid-structure interaction problems. SPH in Abaqus is a meshless approach that uses a set of particles to discretize the fluid domain. The Abaqus SPH modeling tutorial is particularly useful for problems with large deformations, fragmentation, and free surface effects. It can be used in combination with other Abaqus features, such as finite element analysis, to model coupled fluid-structure systems. This Abaqus SPH tutorial, created by CAE Assistant group, can help you understand and apply this method through practical examples, some of which include projectile impact simulation on a cementitious material, TNT explosion simulation inside a rock using the SPH method, bullet movement through a water pipe in Abaqus, and bird strike simulation in Abaqus.